MARINE SCIENCE

Under the guidance of educators Stacy Myers and Jon Snow, Hayground’s unique and innovative science program builds on the school’s longstanding tradition of exploring and studying our environment as an outdoor classroom. Along with the Science of Art curriculum, Hayground’s budding marine scientists, marine biologists and botanists are focusing on the two current projects described below.

Our work in partnership with Stacy Myers, Cornell University CCE Suffolk South Fork Marine Education Program, has opened up avenues of action and service that connect us deeply to this place we love and hope to protect."

Thanks,

Healthy Bodies / Healthy Bays 

This class is designed to get students outdoors promoting healthy lifestyles, while providing learning activities that will help students make the connection between human impacts on both health, and environment.  A strong focus will be on Long Island geology and water quality Students will hike 1 mile up the Morraine (Brick Hill Preserve).

Students will then spend time at Trout Pond observing the low point of the moraine and the dynamic fresh water ecosystem that once was Noyak river entering Peconic Bay. This unique environment has a long and detailed history of human impacts and use directly related to ground water and the adjacent saltwater ecosystem Peconic Bay.

This field trip will introduce the following topics will include but are not limited to:

  • Local and natural history
  • Geology
  • Groundwater 
  • Living things and their environment
  • Characteristics of living things
  • Life cycles both plants and animals and Living organisms and their environment
  • Students will identify the ways in which and organism’s habitat provides for its basic needs

A focus on periodic phenomena students will identify events around us that have repeating patterns, including seasons of the year, tidal changes, the water cycle and day and night. We will introduce how plants and animals adapt to periodic phenomena and relate it directly to Brick Hill Preserve and Trout Pond.

Learning standards: Life sciences and Earth science

Skills of Inquiry

  • Ask questions about objects, organisms, and events in the environment.
  • Tell about why and what would happen if ?
  • Make predictions based on observed patterns.
  • Name and use simple equipment and tools for scientific investigation.
  • Record observations and data with pictures, numbers, or written statements.
  • Discuss observations with peers.

Native Plants and outdoor classroom on school Property

Native Plants and outdoor field-work in school outdoor classroom the dune system area directly in ground not located in garden beds.

Begin the installation of a native plant garden behind dune system. Started in 2014 with dune grass plants and milk weed seeds collected on campus potted out and planted directly on property at Hayground.

Students will designed and installed this native plant garden to observe long term plant life cycle phases of the native plants commonly found in our coastal sand dune and fore dune.

This on campus dune system/garden/outdoor classroom will be observed all seasons. Students will document the life cycle phases of the plants and the changes environmentally. Seed collection and plant propagation will be the extended study implemented year to year.

The goal of this educational dune system is to encourage coastal dune conservation and general awareness and function of this complex ecosystem. A strong focus and field work will introduce students to the elements that shape our dunes waves, tides, and wind.

This program can be integrated with both Literacy, Math and Art departments.

Learning standards: Life sciences and Earth science                                          

Skills of Inquiry

  • Ask questions about plants, organisms, and events in the environment.
  • Tell about why and what would happen if?
  • Make predictions based on observed patterns. Think like a scientist and botanist
  • Name and use simple equipment and tools for scientific investigation.
  • Learn and observe the elements that shape our shores (waves, tides, wind)
  • Record observations and data with pictures, numbers, or written statements.
  • Discuss observations with peers.
  • Present to a larger scale group of both peers and adult

 

Students observe marine organisms in the Discovery Tank

Students observe marine organisms in the Discovery Tank

Students observe marine organisms in the Discovery Tank  

Students observe marine organisms in the Discovery Tank

 

Students participating in a Global Oceans class. Students study currents tides and marine biodiversity from a global perspective.

Students participating in a Global Oceans class. Students study currents tides and marine biodiversity from a global perspective.

Students feeding Sea Horses. The students participated in an introduction to Aquaculture and life cycle course hatching Brine Shrimp for live food for the Discovery Tank  

Students feeding Sea Horses. The students participated in an introduction to Aquaculture and life cycle course hatching Brine Shrimp for live food for the Discovery Tank

 

Students participating in a marine biodiversity field ecology class on Shinnecock Bay

Students participating in a marine biodiversity field ecology class on Shinnecock Bay

Student carefully picking up a long wristed hermit crab for observation during the marine biodiversity field trip

Student carefully picking up a long wristed hermit crab for observation during the marine biodiversity field trip

Students observing juvenal horseshoe crabs in a tide pool during a Saltmarsh ecology class Tiana Bay

Students observing juvenal horseshoe crabs in a tide pool during a Saltmarsh ecology class Tiana Bay

Students compare and contrast the patterns in nature formed as the outgoing tidal water retreats

Students compare and contrast the patterns in nature formed as the outgoing tidal water retreats